MSBuild Extras Toolkit for Asp.Net 1.1

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I don’t know about you guys, but I’ve recently found myself switching back and forth between Visual Studio 2003 and Visual Studio 2005 since I’m working on applications written in both Asp.Net 2.0 and Asp.Net 1.1. Most of the applications I’m working with right now are written in Asp.Net 1.1 and I’m not ready to update those components yet. In fact I’m not sure if I will ever update some of these as the are coming to the end of their life anyway. I will still need to support these apps and perform maintenance on the code even if I never add another feature.

I would prefer to just start working totally with VS2005 since it does have quite a few enhancements to the workflow that VS2003 does not contain. Well this has not really been possible until now. Enter MSBuild Toolkit for Asp.Net 1.1. I have not tried the component yet but their is a project over at GotDotNet workspaces that claims to allow you to build Asp.Net 1.1 projects using VS2005. I’m not sure how well it works yet, but I will be trying it soon. According to the project page: Since the release of MSBuild in .NET Framework 2.0, a very frequent customer request has been to provide a means for MSBuild to build .NET 1.1 applications. This demand stems from users who want to use Visual Studio 2005 and .NET 2.0 but need to continue servicing customers who use .NET 1.1.

MSBuild Extras – Toolkit for .NET 1.1 “MSBee” is an addition to MSBuild that allows developers to build managed applications in Visual Studio 2005 that target .NET 1.1. MSBee is a member of Power Toys for Visual Studio, developed by the Developer Solutions Team. Since it is built by the Microsoft Development Team, I’m sure it works as advertised so this may prove a good method for helping me to simply my development life a little. Look for the MSBee project at GotDotNet for more information.

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Core Competencies in Open Source Projects

I recently decided to go to grad school and obtain my masters in MIS with an emphasis in security. Securing systems has always been a passion of mine and there was probably even a time when I wanted to see if I could break them. It just seems like some fun knowledge to have and with the current climate in the Information technology industry security training will be a skill to have and will make me more marketable.

Well I just completed my first series of classes and it was very stressful since I took two classes and they where pushed into an eight week time frame. Couple this with the fact that I still go to work every day it makes for some very full weeks, when both professors expected me to read 5 or 6 chapters every week and write at least one paper. Well I made it through and even managed to pull two A’s out of the classes. One of the classes turned out to be very interesting even though I did not see eye to eye with the professor, he did disseminate some very useful information. This class was Strategic Management of Technology and the majority of the course dealt with determining the core competencies of an organization and encouraging innovation around those core competencies. For clarity a core competency is defined as:

  • Something that provides access to a wide variety of markets.
  • Something that provides a perceived value to the customers of a product
  • It must be difficult for competitors to imitate.

Now all through the class the professor kept telling us to define what our core competencies where to build up those competencies. I’ve been thinking a lot about that lately and he is absolutely correct, I need to build up my competencies and use those competencies to compete in my everyday life. That’s is one reason I decided to start working on this blog and capture my thoughts on a daily basis. Hopefully it will help me to define where I want to go next. I’ve definitely determined it is not to continue to work a 9-5 job every day as I have done through out my entire career.

Well enough of me, I started looking at the various projects available in Asp.Net and I am have been trying to determine the competencies for the various open source projects. I first thought of the Rainbow project. I would think their core competencies is in their localization of their framework as it is probably one of the most complete implementations of localization of any of the open source or shared source projects available in the .Net community ( at least of the ones I’ve seen). Now Rainbow is not one of the most popular projects by a long ways so either their core competency is not really a great competency as it does not provide them with a broad range of markets, but it is a needed feature and they have done it very well, but maybe that is not the most important feature to the developers in the Asp.Net community.

Now thinking of DotNetNuke, I can think of several competencies. The first one that comes to mind is the multiple portal feature where you can have hundreds of web sites on a single installation of DNN this is definitely the killer feature that allowed DNN to gain its foothold in the community and has also allowed it to become the most popular asp.net project by a long shot. But I don’t really think this could be described as a core competency for DNN, but it probably was one at one time. DNN’s true core competency is in the community around the project. The community is what gives DNN its position and without the strength of the community, I would think DNN would have faltered long ago and would now be only a memory or have numerous forks all working towards different goals. Its getting late so I will need to finish these thoughts later, but I just find it interesting that a competency of a open source project probably has less to do with the cool code it contains than it does with the people who support it. I would say this it probably true of any successful open source endeavor. The community is what creates value in open source an not really the code. So for all the people who says if a web application is not built utilizing LAMP, then its not true open source maybe they should think again and consider open source is about a lot more than the platform that runs or creates the application. I personally think its more about the community and sharing and not just whether it runs as platform independent.